Who can you go to for help for dating violence

 raising awareness of issues that impact the health of an individual or a group of people.

Whether you are a parent, a friend, or a teen yourself – knowing about the violence that can occur during teen dating, as well as the signs of abuse, can help save a life.

Caring advocates on the hotline and in your local program can help you think through how to be safe in an emergency, during a domestic violence incident, while getting help from resources in the community, and when you’re with your children—this is called a “safety plan.” To learn more about tribal domestic violence programs and resources available for Native/Indigenous communities, contact the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center.

The Department of Justice’s Office on Violence Against Women funds tribal domestic violence services.

As you make decisions about how to get away from the abuse and ensure your own safety, developing a safety plan becomes more and more important.Dating violence occurs because one partner chooses to forcefully exert power and control over the other partner. Often there are signs early on, like jealousy and possessiveness.Unfortunately, these signs may be interpreted as affection.From prom season to football season, students everywhere in middle and high school are navigating love, dating and relationships.Yet for all the relationships that are safe and healthy, one in five female high school students and one in 10 male high school students who date have been affected by some form of dating violence, with one out of 10 students experiencing some form of physical violence.

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