Signs you are dating someone with bipolar disorder

Other motives for self-harm do not fit into medicalised models of behaviour and may seem incomprehensible to others, as demonstrated by this quotation: "My motivations for self-harming were diverse, but included examining the interior of my arms for hydraulic lines.

This may sound strange." For some people, harming themselves can be a means of drawing attention to the need for help and to ask for assistance in an indirect way.

Behaviours associated with substance abuse and eating disorders are not considered self-harm because the resulting tissue damage is ordinarily an unintentional side effect.

The desire to self-harm is a common symptom of borderline personality disorder.

The onset of puberty has also been shown to be the onset of self-harm including the onset of sexual activity; this is because the pubertal period is a period of neurodevelopmental vulnerability and comes with an increased risk of emotional disorders and risk-taking behaviors.

Genetics may contribute to the risk of developing other psychological conditions, such as anxiety or depression, which could in turn lead to self-harming behaviour.

Studies of individuals with developmental disabilities (such as intellectual disability) have shown self-harm being dependent on environmental factors such as obtaining attention or escape from demands.

People with other mental disorders may also self-harm, including those with depression, anxiety disorders, substance abuse, eating disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder, schizophrenia, and several personality disorders.

There are a number of different methods that can be used to treat self-harm and which concentrate on either treating the underlying causes or on treating the behaviour itself.

It may also be an attempt to affect others and to manipulate them in some way emotionally.

Many people who self-harm state that it allows them to "go away" or dissociate, separating the mind from feelings that are causing anguish.

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